Sea caves of New Aberdour

Pink, orange and deep red against turquoise, blue and grey. That is how we picture New Aberdour Beach when we think about our latest slow adventure. The red sandstone walls circling the beach gives the sand a soft pink tint and the ebbing tide provided the perfect backdrop for this slow adventure, exploring the cave and rock pools of the New Aberdour beach. 

Sea cave at New Aberdour beach

Deciding to go to New Aberdour

We started looking for the little unmarked beach after a recommendation from family in Aberdeen. Naturally they are aware of our love for small local places where we can explore and connect with nature. It's especially exciting when we're recommended a place like New Aberdour through family, because then we know it will be worth the trip. We started from Aberdeen and drove north on windy, narrow roads. We must have passed hundred fluffy sheep, tractors, cows and pheasants. When you finally arrive, there is a big parking space and the beach is easy to access. See the end of the article for a map. 

Rock pools are safe havens for miniature sea creatures.  

Parts of the beach are sandy, while other parts are full of interesting pebbles. Further out - exposed by the tide, you can find small sea creatures living protected lives in sheltered rock pools, carved out of the sand stone by the crushing waves. The rock pools are like natural aquariums, where the calm surface is your glass window. We found that it was easier to look inside when the surface reflected something dark, like a rock or one of our shadows. Walking on slippy rocks is not always the best, but the rough sandstone provided grip and made the exploring accessible. 

 An empty rock pool waiting for a small crab to move in. 

An empty rock pool waiting for a small crab to move in. 

Accessible sea cave with an ocean view

The big sea cave at the end of the beach is perhaps the main attraction. You simply walk along the beach and enter the cave close to the back wall of read sandstone. Like a passage, the cave is more outstretched and long than it is broad. As mentioned before, our visit was timed with a low tide, allowing us to explore the cave and the surrounding rock pools without being concerned about not getting back. 

 Mark entering the largest sea cave from the beach

Mark entering the largest sea cave from the beach

 Thea after coming out of the cave on the sea side. See the cave exit in the background.

Thea after coming out of the cave on the sea side. See the cave exit in the background.

Caves spark the imagination

Being in a cave is special. Sounds change, the lack of light reinforces every feature and triggers the imagination. Tales of pirates, smugglers, and of lost love rush through your mind, making us curious. How old is it? What's happened underneath this sandy ceiling? How long can I be here before it will fill again with water and take all the tales back out to sea? 

 Mark standing in front of the cave exit towards the sea. 

Mark standing in front of the cave exit towards the sea. 

 View into the cave, from the seaside. 

View into the cave, from the seaside. 

Slow adventures connects us to the landscape

Exploring wild nature makes us healthy and happy, sparking the everyday imagination while demanding the use of all our senses. There are no other distractions. Exploring makes us open-minded and aware of the landscape. A place like the beach at New Aberdour is largely quiet and the few locals that would wonder down the path are more likely to provide an interesting conversation than disturb your adventure. 

Find this slow adventure on the map